Thursday, December 3, 2009

Haunted Places in Wisconsin

Under the watchful eye of goddesses, angels and shrouded mourners, visitors to the now 200-acre Forest Home Cemetery in Milwaukee wind their way through the undulating landscape. The cemetery's original 72 acres were established in 1850 on a site known to be a former American Indian village and burial mound. Some have said the hill adjacent to the reflecting pond on the north side of the cemetery has caused them to feel sick and fearful after walking upon it. One visitor reported visions of splintered coffins and shredded corpses, followed by the onset of headaches and bloodshot eyes.
Corey Schjoth/for The Wausau Daily Herald


Resting near the shores of Lake Superior, Fairlawn Mansion was built for industrialist and Superior's second mayor Martin Pattison and his family in 1890. The 42-room mansion was designed in the Queen Anne Victorian style that was popular at the time. After Pattison's death in 1918, Martin's wife Grace donated the mansion to be used as an orphanage. Later purchased in 1963 by the City of Superior for $12,500 in hopes of preserving a part of the town's history. Visitors taking tours have reported seeing a woman dressed in period clothing helping them find displays then vanishing. Ghosts of two children are reported to be seen and heard playing near the swimming pool in the basement.

During the time when Native Americans occupied the hill where the Scott Mansion rests now a curse was put upon the land as revenge for the death of the chief's daughter who fur traders at the time called Jenny. According to legend she either died of shame by her own hand or was killed because she was pregnant with a fur trader's child. In 1884 Scott mansion was being constructed for Thomas Blythe Scott who died before the house was finished. His widow, Anna, died the following year. Their son, Walter, sold the mansion, but died ten years later from being stabbed with a letter opener after an argument. The Scotts never lived in the mansion. Ever since that time any one who has owned the house has met untimely death. Corey Schjoth/for The Wausau Daily Herald
For more of this article visit... Central Wisconsin Hub

1 comment:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete